Salads for a Summer Picnic

Picnicking in state parks can be a ton of fun with games, activities and food. But what is a picnic without a delicious salad? Not sure what type of salad to make? Check out some of these salads for your summer picnic.

Mexican Coleslaw

Courtesy of delish.com

This coleslaw goes best on a taco or you can munch on it as a snack. This recipe serves 8 and the total time to make it is 20 minutes.

Cabbage Mexican Coleslaw

Image: www.tattoodonkey.com

Ingredients

  • 6 cups of thinly sliced green cabbage (1/2 head)
  • ½ cup peeled and grated carrots (2-3 medium)
  • 1/3 cups of chopped cilantro
  • ¼ cups of rice vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons of extra-virgin olive oil
  • ¼ teaspoon of salt

Directions

1. Place cabbage and carrots in a colander; rinse thoroughly with cold water to crisp. Let drain for 5 minutes.

2. Whisk cilantro, vinegar, oil and salt in a large bowl. Add cabbage and carrots; toss well to coat.

Tomato, Onion and Cucumber Salad

 Courtesy of eatingwell.com

This is the simplest salad to make, especially if you are in a hurry heading to your state park for a good picnic spot. This recipe serves 6 and total time to make is 50 minutes.

Cucumber, Tomato, Onion Salad

Image: www.pinterest.com/pin/173177548141326359/

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons of rice vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon canola oil
  • 1 teaspoon of honey
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • 2 medium cucumbers
  • 4 medium tomatoes (cut into ½ wedges)
  • 1 sweet onion (halved and thinly sliced)
  • 2 tablespoons of freshly chopped herbs (parsley, chives)

 Directions

  1. Whisk vinegar, oil, honey, salt and pepper in a large shallow bowl.
  2. Remove alternating stripes of peel from the cucumbers. Slice the cucumbers into thin rounds. Add the cucumber slices, tomatoes and onion to the dressing; gently toss to combine. Let stand at room temperature for 30 minutes.
  3. Just before serving, add herbs and toss again.

Seven-Layer Salad

 Courtesy of recipe.com

This recipe is Midwestern. It has layers of lettuce, peas, bell peppers and tomatoes with a tangy dressing. The best thing about this salad is that it stays fresh until it is time for your picnic. This recipe serves 10 and total time to make is 30 minutes.

Colorful Seven layer salad

Image: tsgcookin.com

Ingredients

  •  8 cups of shredded romaine lettuce
  • 1 cup frozen peas, thawed
  • 1 medium yellow bell pepper, diced
  • 1 cup halved grape tomatoes
  • 1 cup sliced celery
  • ½ cup sliced scallions
  • ¾ cup nonfat plain yogurt
  • ¾ cup low-fat mayonnaise
  • 2 teaspoons of cider vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • ¼ teaspoon garlic powder
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon ground pepper
  • ½ cup shredded reduced-fat cheddar cheese
  • ½ cup thinly sliced fresh basil
  • 3 strip cooked bacon, crumbled

Directions

1. Place lettuce in a large bowl. Layer peas, bell pepper, tomatoes, celery and scallions on top.

2. Whisk yogurt, mayonnaise, vinegar, sugar to taste, garlic powder, salt and pepper in a medium bowl until smooth. Spread the dressing evenly over the top of the salad. Sprinkle with cheese, basil and bacon.

 Roasted Corn, Black Bean, and Mango Salad

Courtesy of myrecipes.com

If you are having a picnic in the park and plan on firing up the grill, here is a refreshing topping for grilled food such as chicken, pork or even salmon for that extra kick! This recipe serves 8 and it takes 45 minutes to make.

Mango Salad

Image: sweetpeaskitchen.com

Ingredients:

  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 2 clove of garlic, minced
  • 3 cups corn kernals
  • 2 cups mango, peeled and diced
  • 2 cans black beans, rinsed
  • ½ cup chopped red onion
  • 1 cup diced red bell pepper
  • 1/3 tablespoons lime juice
  • 1 small can chipotle pepper in adobo sauce, drained and chopped
  • 3 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

Directions

1. Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add garlic; cook 30 seconds. Stir in corn; cook 8 minutes or until browned, stirring occasionally. Place corn mixture in a large bowl. Add mango and remaining ingredients except greens; stir well. Arrange 1 cup greens on each of 8 plates. Spoon 1 cup corn mixture over greens.

Playground and picnic area near water

Image: www.tripadvisor.com

Download your state’s Pocket Ranger® app to find a state park near you with a picnic area and a playground so your whole family can enjoy the day. Happy summer picnicking!

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How to Catch Monster Trout

Larger trout behave differently than smaller trout because they require more energy. For example, large trout aren’t going to target small flies as often as small trout do. This is because the energy return from feeding on small flies is less for large fish than it is for small fish. Therefore, catching monster trout is going to require a few tactical adjustments. Here are some tips to help get you started:

Fish Big Trout Waters

Yellowstone river [image: www.nps.gov]

Yellowstone river [image: www.nps.gov]

That secret stretch of mountain stream is great, but it’s probably not going to produce many fish over 20 inches. There is simply not enough food. Focus your attention on larger rivers and lakes where adequate food supplies grow big trout.

Bait

Big streamer, big trout [image: www.current-works.com]

Big streamer, big trout [image: www.current-works.com]

All trout eat small aquatic insects, but only smaller trout eat them exclusively. Salmon flies, large stonefly nymphs, imitation crayfish, large streamers, imitation crayfish, and baitfish are all excellent options for targeting big fish. Power hitters often strike out, but they also hit homeruns.

Timing and Weather

Night fishing [Image: www.simmsfishing.com]

Night fishing [Image: www.simmsfishing.com]

The guy who catches a monster trout at noon with a nightcrawler is the exception not the rule. Whereas smaller fish feed throughout the day, larger trout are more selective and prefer the low light conditions of early morning or late evening-sometimes even the dead of night. On bright sunny days the monsters, especially the browns, tend to go into hiding. Target those days on the water when a front rolls in or days when a summer shower whips these fish into a feeding frenzy.

Spawning Season

Spawning trout [image: goeddelphotography.com]

Spawning trout [image: goeddelphotography.com]

According to Izaak Walton’s The Compleat Angler (1653), the brown trout is “a fish that is so like a buck, that he also has his seasons.” Indeed, browns become more aggressive during the fall months when they move out of lakes and up rivers to spawn. More big browns are caught in the early fall than at any other time.

Suggested Gear List: 

  • Streamer Flies
  • Wading Gear
  • Sunscreen

Check out our Pocket Ranger® Gear Store for these items and more!

 

August’s Best State Park Events

wave, summer, beach, sand, surf

Image: nnym.youthministry360.com

August, already?! We here at ParksByNature can’t believe it either. End your summer right by heading to one (or all!) of these great events at the State Parks.

Woodsmen’s Show
Cherry Springs State Park, Pennsylvania
August 1-3, 2014

lumberjacks, log, tree, saw, cross-cutting, grass, crowd, people, summer, suspenders, woodsmen

Cross-cutting at the Woodsmen’s Show [Image: www.sungazette.com]

Want to see lumberjacks fell, saw, carve, haul, axe and roll giant logs? Come celebrate the life of a woodhick at the three-day annual Woodsmen’s Show at Cherry Springs State Park! Since 1952, thousands have flocked to the Woodsmen’s Show to watch cross-cutting, spring board chopping, chainsaw carving, and horse pulling competitions. Inspired by all the axe throwing and log rolling? Then sign up for the show’s amateur lumberjack competitions! At the historical logging camp, you’ll find demonstrations of traditional hunting, forging and raft-making techniques. Rousing live folk and bluegrass music will play throughout, and don’t forget to indulge in all of the show’s hearty food. Besides its logging history, Cherry Springs State Park is legendary for its dark skies. The skies at the park are so dark that the Milky Way casts a shadow! Reserve a campsite so you can see for yourself.

Jericho ATV Festival
Jericho Mountain State Park, New Hampshire
August 1-3, 2014

mud pit, ATVs, race, mud, helmets, arctic cat, fence, crowd

Nothing like a good mud pit! [Image: www.coupleofsports.com]

It’s all about the mud at the 5th Annual Jericho ATV Festival. For one weekend, hundreds of ATVs, quads, dirt bikes, and dune buggies will be mudding it up in the waist-deep mud pits, cruising down Main Street, and tackling Jericho Mountain’s plentiful ATV trails. From amateurs to pros, everyone can compete in poker runs, obstacle courses, ATV pulls, mud pit races and grudge runs, and the popular “wreck the dress” race. For demos, giveaways, live music, beer tent and plenty of good BBQ head to the festival’s Downtown Block Party in Berlin, New Hampshire. And be sure to check out the Rave X Freestyle Show: A dirt biker and quad rider will perform heart-stopping stunts 20 feet in the air!

Away from the competition, take a ride along the 80 miles of trail at Jericho Mountain State Park. This extensive trail network offers the best OHRV riding New England has to offer with breathtaking views and varied terrain to satisfy all riders. Use Pocket Ranger®’s Official Guide for New Hampshire State Parks to mark waypoints and keep track of friends while ATV-ing together on the trails.

Twin Peaks Festival
Olallie State Park, Washington
August 1-3, 2014

Twin Peaks, tv show, Washington, forest, sign, trees, road, car, mountains

Image: twinpeaksgifs.tumblr.com

This August, fans from all over the world will flock just east of Seattle to Olallie State Park for the annual Twin Peaks Fest. Aired in the early 1990’s, this cult classic TV show by director and writer David Lynch was inspired by the area’s waterfalls, dense woods, and small town-feel. Look forward to touring the show’s filming locations and watching the pilot episode of Twin Peaks on the big screen. On Saturday night, get gussied up as your favorite character for the costume contest and dine alongside actual Twin Peaks celebrities. This year’s celebrity guests include Sherilyn Fenn (Audrey Horne), Chris Mulkey (Hank Jennings), James Marshall (James Hurley) and more! The festival closes with a Tibetan rock-throw contest and that iconic piece of cherry pie.

Sioux River Folk Festival
Newton Hills State Park, South Dakota
August 1-3, 2014

folk music, festival, fiddle, banjo, musicians, sioux river folk festival, guitars

Image: www.folkatfestival.com

Get ready for three days of live fiddlin’ music, dancing, and family fun! The annual Sioux River Folk Festival at Newton Hills State Park features traditional music, such as folk, bluegrass, old time, and gospel played by some of the very best. Throughout the weekend, music and yoga workshops will also be held. During the Saturday break, musically-inclined festival-goers can sign up for a juried campground contest. Winners of this talent contest open for the festival’s big closing set on Saturday night and receive an original Headley Eyesore artwork signed by the artist himself. So you don’t miss a moment, reserve a campsite at the park using Pocket Ranger®’s Official Guide for South Dakota Game, Fish & Parks app.

World’s Longest Yard Sale
DeSoto State Park, Alabama
August 7-10, 2014

yard sale, quilts, knick-knacks, barnyard, dolls, pink, bargains, Alabama

Miles of bargains! [Image: worldslongestyardsaleproject.blogspot.com]

Did you miss Kentucky’s 400 Mile Sale or are you just hungry for more thrifting? This August, the heart of the World’s Longest Yard Sale traverses Alabama’s DeSoto State Park. As seen on HGTV, USA Today, Newsweek, and The Tonight Show, the World’s Longest Yard Sale follows U.S. 126 Corridor from Gadsden, Alabama to Addison, Michigan for more than 690-miles of scenic beauty and bargain finds. Take a dip in DeSoto State Park’s Olympic-size pool before hitting the road for another day of yard sales.

Annual Day of Honor Event
Chief Plenty Coups State Park, Montana
August 30, 2014

Native Americans, Montana, west, grass, festival, feathers, beadwork, dancing

Traditional dancing at the Day of Honor [Image: visitmt.com]

A day of cultural sharing, the 20th Annual Day of Honor at Chief Plenty Coups State Park commemorates the last chief of the Apsaalooke (Crow) people and his legacy of promoting understanding, peace and harmony among races. Visitors can tour Chief Plenty Coups’ log house and gravesite, and place prayer flags at the sacred medicine spring. Throughout the day, listen to storytellers and watch traditional dancing accompanied by drumming. Browse the craft fair for treasures, such as beaded items, Native American dolls, and paintings. Don’t leave before partaking in the park’s FREE buffalo feast! To feed the 600 guests, the park staff at Chief Plenty Coups State Park slow-roast a buffalo in a giant pit for twelve hours on the Day of Honor. Roast bison is served with all the traditional fixings, including corn on the cob, fry bread, watermelon and berry pudding.

Attend any of these events? We’d love to hear about it!
Leave a comment or share a photo with us on our Facebook page!

Masters of Disguise: The Best of Animal Mimicry

No one is sure what type of animal this mimic octopus is mimicking. [Image: www.cfrieds.tumblr.com]

If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, then animal mimicry is the highest. Mother Nature took camouflage to the next level with mimicry. In order to survive in this dog-eat-dog bird-eat-bug world, some creatures have evolved the ability to appear as other, more deadly creatures in a race for survival of the fittest. In this article, we’ll discuss animal mimicry that involves appearance and sound. So next time you are out there in the woods, take a second look. Things aren’t always what they appear to be!

Mimic Octopus

The mimic octopus wasn’t discovered until 1998, probably because it was always disguised as some other species. The mimic octopus has the ability to seemingly change its look to resemble anything in its environment, especially venomous animals such as sea snakes, lion fish and jellyfish. This octopus uses animal mimicry to change its skin’s tone, shape and texture. So far, it’s the only known animal in the world that can impersonate such a wide variety of creatures. But, not to be outdone, the jawfish has the ability to mimic the mimic octopus that mimics fish. That’s a story for another time.

Lyrebird 

Lyrebirds are evolution at its best. These ground-dwelling birds are famous for their ability to mimic virtually any sound — manmade or found in nature. Lyrebirds have three pairs of syringeal muscles (other songbirds have four), so it’s believed that it is this differentiation that allows them this stunning mimicking ability, although it is not yet known if this type of animal mimicry is a defensive or offensive mechanism or why exactly they mimic certain sounds.

Lyrebirds were introduced to the mainstream in David Attenborough’s Life of Birds. In this documentary, one can see a lyrebird mimicking the sounds of chainsaws and camera clicks. Some have said this is because two of the birds were held in captivity around humans, therefore, they had lots of time to mimic manmade sounds, but still, it’s an impressive gift to have for any animal to have.

Mexican Milk Snake

If you could be any other animal, wouldn’t you want to be a venomous one? That’s what the Mexican milk snake decided to do. This nonvenomous species of milk snake boasts similar color patterns as the deadly coral snake. They grow from 24 to 30 inches and can be found in Texas and northeastern Mexico. If you ever find yourself confronted by one, just remember old adage, “Red on yellow, you’re a dead fellow. Red on black,  you’re all right, Jack.”

animal mimicry

Bottom: Texas Coral Snake [Image: http://ferreneelee[er/wordpress.com] Top: Mexican Milk Snake [Image: www.pphotography-blog.blogspot.com]

Katydids

Katydids, also called leaf bugs, are the embodiment of mimicry in every sense. There are more than 6,000 species of katydids in the world. They’re sometimes mistakenly identified as grasshoppers, but are more closely related to crickets. They’re mostly found in tropical areas such as the rainforest, but more than 100 species reside in the United States. Katydids live, you guessed it, on trees, bushes and in grass. Their resemblance to leaves helps avoid being eaten by predators such as birds, bats, spiders and frogs.

animal mimicry

Image: www.thefeaturedcreature.com

How to Dry a Wet iPhone

iPhones and the great outdoors don’t always mix. An inopportune downpour or slip while crossing a stream can leave you with a soaked phone. While a wet and unresponsive iPhone is a frightening thing, there’s no need to panic-yet. By following these simple tips and tricks you may be able to reverse the damage.

Don't take your iPhone swimming [image: blogs.timesofisrael.com]

Don’t take your iPhone swimming [image: blogs.timesofisrael.com]

The first thing you want to do is get your phone out of the water as quickly as possible. But do not turn it on! Turning it on may cause the phone to short out. Reducing the time your phone is wet will greatly enhance its chances of survival. Also remove any earphones, accessories, plugs, or protective devices.

image: www.keepcalm-o-matic.co.uk

image: www.keepcalm-o-matic.co.uk

Pat the phone down gently with a towel or t-shirt. You want to remove all surface water as quickly as possible. If you have one, use a vacuum with a small attachment to suck the water out of the connector and headset jack. Do not use a hairdryer. Air from the hairdryer may force moisture deeper into the phone. Heat from a hair dryer can melt phone components as well.

Do not use a hairdryer [image: www.gadgetrx.net]

Do not use a hairdryer [image: www.gadgetrx.net]

Purchase a desiccant such as silica gel or DampRid. Both can be found for less than 10 dollars at a hardware store. Immerse the phone in uncooked rice along with silica gel/DampRid packets and then seal the mixture in a plastic bag. Let it sit overnight.

image: www.zdnet.com

image: www.zdnet.com

After 24 hours remove the phone and turn it on. If it turns on and seems functional, plug it into a wall and see if it holds a charge. If it won’t charge beyond a certain percentage put the phone back into the rice for another 12 hours. You should be able to recover the full use of the phone’s battery. If the phone doesn’t turn on after 24 or 36 hours, take it to the apple store and begin funeral arrangements.

Birds Commonly Found in California

California is ideal for finding those rare birding moments. Even if you’re not readily searching, birds are bound to cross your path; all you have to do is listen and look. From loners, to bird flocks flying across the sky, one is always met by a new bird companion. In San Francisco, the Northwestern Blackbirds perch on wires; along Monterey Bay, Brown Pelicans hang out by the pier, and falcons soar high in Yosemite National Park. There are 600 known bird species living in California. Here’s a list of birds commonly found in California, and the particular places where they were last seen.

 Stellar’s Jay

Image: deviantart.net

Image: deviantart.net

On one morning, a flock of them greeted tourists on their way to Bridalveil Fall. This crazy-looking bird can be seen flying around Yosemite Valley singing “shaack, shaack.” Their ruby blue and black color stands out from the mostly green coniferous forests of Yosemite National Park. Stellar’s Jay are abundant from southern Alaska to Pacific Coast to the Rocky mountains, through Mexico and into Central America. They prefer to eat seeds, acorns, fruits, frogs, snakes, insects, and will even resort to stealing from other birds. They are one of the few birds to use mud in their nest construction.

Black-billed Magpie

Image: pt.treknature.com

Image: pt.treknature.com

This species was spotted on the trail to Sentinel Dome in Yosemite National Park. Hidden by some skinny pine trees, two magpies danced around in flight above a fallen tree truck. In the eerie silence all you can here is their “wock, wock wock-a-wock.” Mostly black with a stout bill, white bellied, and a long tail of iridescent blue and green-black, the magpie is a beautiful bird to watch in flight. It eats insects, larvae, carrion, and lives in Alaska to western and central Canada, and northern California. During winter it travels far east to Ontario and Minnesota. It prefers woodlands, savannas, and streams.

Anna’s Hummingbird

Image: https://www.tumblr.com/search/anna's+hummingbird

Image: www.tumblr.com/search/anna’s+hummingbird

These hummingbirds with their distinct “chee-chee-chee” song can be found along the west coast, often varying from desert to mountain, including bushy woodlands and gardens. If you’re lucky you can see them near Venice Beach roaming around the palm trees when the early morning strikes. Males are usually of the rose-red head and throat with the iridescent bronze-green body. Some interesting facts: Anna’s Hummingbirds consume more insects than any other hummingbird, and their hearts goes fast at 1,260 beats per minute, while a human heart only beats from 60 to 100. Luckily, breeding range has expanded due to the planting of ornamental plants. They usually feed on nectar, insects, spiders, and sap.

Prairie Falcon

Image: Mike Forsman www.tumblr.com/search/Prairie+Falcon

Image: Mike Forsman www.tumblr.com/search/Prairie+Falcon

This medium falcon can be seen soaring in the sky or perched on a cliff, singing “kree, kree, kree.” It has a pale brown back in pattern form with brown spots, and bars on its white chest. They eat small birds, mammals, and large insects. They are swift fliers with rapid wing beats. Sometimes they alternate several rapid wing beats with a glide. The Prairie Falcon prefers barren mountains, dry plains and prairies. It feeds on lizards, Mourning Doves, squirrels, pikas, and even pretty rosy-finches. They usually grab their prey by swooping at a low angle to surprise them on the ground.

Black-Phoebe

Image: Jerry Kirkhart www.flickr.com

Image: Jerry Kirkhart www.flickr.com

This medium fly-catcher eats mostly insects, and sometimes small fish. It has shallow wing beats, and goes from perch to perch to catch insects in the air. The Black-Phoebe has a distinct sound of “seek, seek,” and lives in coastal Oregon and throughout California. Its body is mostly black except for its white chubby belly.  It prefers shady habitats, near lakes, streams, and even above a window. They are full-on insectivores, feasting on bees, wasps, beetles, grasshoppers, dragonflies, termites, and spiders. Males have a funny tendency: they show females the potential nest sites, but the female has the final say when choosing, and even does her own nest construction. The Black-Phoebe is known to be territorial and solitary.

 

Turkey Vulture

Image: Jan Arendtsz www.flickr.com

Image: Jan Arendtsz www.flickr.com

These birds have the keen ability to find fresh carcasses, so if you think you’re seeing an eagle— no, its just a Turkey Vulture waiting for you to fully tire out from hiking. How do you know its a Turkey Vultures? Generally, they soar with their wings raised in a V while making circles. Their sense of smell makes them successful scavengers, mostly eating mammals but also snacking on reptiles, other birds, amphibians, and fish. Though they prefer fresh dead meat, they do have to wait for their meal to soften to better puncture the skinand surprisingly they never attack living prey. They live along roadsides, suburbs, farm fields, countryside, and landfills. They are bigger than most raptors, with the exception of eagles and condors. From a distance they appear black, but upon close inspection, they are dark brown, and have white coloring under their wings. Resting on its body is a featherless red head and a pale bill.

For more on birds, check out  the Pocket Ranger® Fish and Wildlife Apps  available in New York, Alabama, Wisconsin, Georgia, Nebraska, and New Jersey. The apps provide bird descriptions, distribution areas, and habitat information, along with features like GPS mapping, a built-in compass, and distance indicator to help you plan your next birding adventure.

Top Reasons to Experience Boating

19th Century boating

Image: 1812now.blogspot.com

Boating has been around for many years. Whether it is kayaking, canoeing, or being on a speedboat, it is something that you must experience to cool off from this summer heat. Here are a few reasons why you should experience boating.

Stress Reducer

Boat moving in water

Image: www.debberanproperties.com

School, work or errands can be stressful, but when you are out in the open water, it consumes all your attention. Stress can eventually take a toll on your body and it is important to stay healthy. The fresh air and Vitamin D will make you a happy boater!

Exercise

Boating and water skiing

Image: www.pinedaleonline.com

If you are feeling that you have no time to work out because you’re busy with your daily life, then boating is just the thing for you. Boating provides great exercise. Once you are on a boat, there are other activities you can do, such as swimming, fishing or waterskiing. You are also doing aerobics while canoeing, paddling or even kayaking. Boating releases natural endorphins, which are great for your health.

Bonding Time

Kids Jumping off boat into water

Image: www.citylifemagazine.ca

Recreational boating can bring your family together, away from the television and video games. Boating creates an atmosphere where you can create wonderful memories. It will also teach your family how to work in teams while docking and cruising.

Easy to Learn

Park Ranger Boating

Image: www.independentmail.com

Learning how to boat takes time and practice, but with the right motivation, anything is possible. There are many things you have to learn about boating including how to tie different types of rope knots. There are many park rangers at state parks that are willing to help and with your Pocket Ranger® app, you will be a boating expert in no time.

Water Access

Boat Ramp in state park

Image: www.lake-lewisville.org

Water Access is closer than you think. There are many state parks that have places to dock and that provide boat rentals of your choice. With a short drive, you can enjoy your mini vacation. With the “Nearest Me” feature in your state’s Pocket Ranger® app, you can easily search for boat ramps that are close to home.

The View

Boating scenery with boat

Image: www.seaturtlespacecoast.org

No matter which state park you choose to go boating at, there will always be a spectacular view. If you choose a route with all water, trees or mountains, you will be fascinated. You will also have the opportunity to see other boaters, water skiers and even jet skiers. Boating is a great way to meet new people and introduce you and your family to other great water sports. You may also have the chance to see wildlife.

Pontoon Boat Fun

Image: www.newportpontoonssales.com

Many state parks offer boating, but to find one closest to you, download your state’s Pocket Ranger® app. Our app offers GPS maps and boating descriptions to help you decide which type of boating fits you best. And remember to check out the Rules and Regulations for boating in your state park.  

Suggested Gear List: 

  • Kayak
  • Life Vests
  • Sunscreen

Check out our Pocket Ranger® Gear Store for these items and more!

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