Category Archives: Do It

Hiking Up Deer Creek Road

Contributed by Michael Restivo of Mike off the Map

Deer Creek Road

The view from the ridge

The Mountain Loop Highway bordering the North Cascades has spectacular and secretive trails that can be hiked year round, ensuring an enchanting view of the mountainous landscape. This past March, I was invited to hike Deer Creek Road, a winding snowshoe trail. While it wasn’t steep, it involved breaking through virgin powder, crossing ice-framed streams, and being surrounded by snowcapped mountains just below the national park. We previously visited this area when we came to hike Gothic Basin, the trailhead just five miles farther up the road. When it snows, this area takes on a whole new character, and much of it is devoid of any other trekkers. The combination of solitude and grandiose vistas gives it some of the best hiking in the state.

Deer Creek Road

The old growth forest

Since the trail isn’t that steep, it makes for easy hiking in the summer. But in winter and early spring, snowshoers and cross-country skiers break through deep powder around a curvy winding road. As I learned, this wide trail bordering Deer Creek is a great introduction for those who are just learning to use snowshoes, and while difficult on the deep snow that we encountered, the scenery changed from an old growth forest to a stunning panorama.

The trailhead starts on the edge of the parking lot and the first mile rises gently through snow-covered pines, curving between the forests before exiting upon a high ridgeline. As the trail drops off a sharp cliff, the trees give way to snowy peaks set dramatically above the fir wilderness. The highlights of the scenery are the glimpses of Vesper Peak, Big Four Mountain, and the upper slopes of Bald Mountain rising just above the landscape. As the trail drops back among the trees, there is a snow-lined stream crossing that cuts right through the middle of the trail and another snow-covered bridge shortly thereafter.

At this point the trail diverges, one path headed toward Kelcema Lake and the other following higher up the ridgeline for more expansive views of the Cascades. Our group, already tired from the 6-mile trail in, decided to break for lunch just before the junction and start back down the trail to the parking area. Once back at the trail head, a second 4-mile flat road sets out just behind the lot and leads to the Big Four Picnic Area, a small clearing revealing an awe-inspiring look at the titular mountain’s huge north face.

From here, another trail sets out for the ice caves, formed by the frequently avalanching face. Although the winter-formed caves had already collapsed by the time we had arrived, they form frequently, and it’s important to stay out of them, as they are structurally unstable.

Deer Creek Road

The north face of big four mountain

The serene wilderness of the Mt. Baker Snoqualmie Forest has trails for every skill level that loop just under the North Cascades, and even the drive in reveals Glacier, Shuksan, and Baker itself from the highway. While it wasn’t as physically demanding as our Gothic Basin hike, breaking through two feet of snow was a challenge and we were amply rewarded with sore legs and splendid views.

Deer Creek Road

Breaking through two feet of snow

Final note: while we were on the southern side of the Mountain Loop Highway, in the days following our hike, the northern side, including the towns of Oso and Darrington, were hit by devastating mudslides. We’re all wishing a swift recovery to the town and our thoughts are with the families of the victims of the tragedy.

 

Happy Golfer’s Day: The ‘Fore’ Best State Park Golf Courses

Put on your polo, grab your clubs, and hop on that cart because’s it’s Golfer’s Day! In honor of this oft-forgotten holiday, we’re giving you ‘fore’ of our favorite state park golf courses. (You don’t even need to say it. We’re cheesy. And we’re proud of it.)

Arrowhead Pointe, Richard B. Russell State Park

Golfweek ranks Arrowhead Pointe as the 4th best golf course in Georgia, and the 7th best municipal course in the nation, so you know it’s something special. It’s an 18-hole layout, and the 14th hole juts out into the lake. The course is on a peninsula within Richard B. Russell State Park, so it provides stunning stunning water views. And, since you’re already in the park, you can rent a pontoon boat, play some disc golf, or go hiking and biking after your round.

Arrowhead_Pointe state park golf course

Image: www.georgiagolf.com

Dale Hollow Lake, Dale Hollow Lake State Resort Park

With its website boasting that it’s “one of the most scenic courses in the country”, Dale Hollow Lake’s 18-hole golf course has been voted by Golf Digest as the 7th best in the state of Kentucky. It’s no surprise, considering its springs, gorges, two ponds, and mountain views. There are three large zoysia trees, a new Clubhouse and Practice Range, and, as part of a resort park, excellent accommodations (check out the Mary Ray Oaken Lodge) and all of the activities (water skiing, scuba diving, nature trails, boating, fishing, etc.) a state park has to offer.

Dale-Hollow-Lake-State-Resort-Park  golf course foliage

Image: Kentucky State Parks

Bear Trace, Cumberland Mountain State Park

We’ve been spitting accolades like nobody’s business, but we had to include this one: Golfweek magazine named Bear Trace the #1 golf course in Tennessee. All 6,900 yards of this par 72 layout feature “flowing brooks and clustered, matured pines”, so you know it’s scenic. Another plus? It’s open seven days a week. And, if you do decide you want to stop golfing but don’t want to leave the outdoors, you can go hiking, fishing, or birding in the park.

bear trace golf course

Image: www.bertramgolfpackages.com

Wasatch Mountain State Park Golf Course, Wasatch Mountain State Park

We’re leaving the south and heading west to Utah’s Wasatch Mountain State Park. There are four 18-hole courses in the park, and Golf Digest rated Wasatch Mountain as one of Utah’s Best Places to Play, giving it a 4.5 out of 5 stars. The course is most popular in the summer, but you can also play in the early spring and late fall. And when your golf course looks like a scenic overlook, there’s really no excuse not to play.

Wasatch-(Mountain)-5th-back best state park golf courses

Image: www.wasatchgolfcourse.com/

What are your favorite state park golf courses? Let us know in the comments!

 

Spring Hiking at Delaware’s White Clay Creek State Park

Contributed by Katie Levy, Adventure-Inspired

One of my favorite things about spending time outdoors is the fact that there’s always something new to discover. You’d think that living in a major metropolitan area would limit my ability to find new places to play outside close to home, but after nearly eight years in Philadelphia, I’m still discovering nearby state parks.

A few weekends ago, I visited Delaware’s White Clay Creek State Park for the first time. I loved it so much that I went back the following weekend. Located just north of Newark, about an hour from Philadelphia, White Clay Creek’s 3,300 acres provide a multitude of opportunities for a variety of activities.

Things to Do

Chestnut Hill Trail

Chestnut Hill Trail

The park’s scenic trails were what drew my hiking partner and me to White Clay Creek State Park for two weekends. On our first visit, we parked at a small fee-free pullout on Creek Road near the edge of the University of Delaware’s campus. We followed the wide, flat White Clay Creek and Tri-Valley trails around the edges of the creek, which was muddy as a result of spring’s impending arrival. We found traces of snow and ice left over from cold winter days and nights. It was a perfect, leisurely afternoon walk.

Judge Morris Estate

Judge Morris Estate

For our second visit, we parked near the beautiful Judge Morris Estate off of Polly Drummond Road. The house, built in the late 1700s, is the former home of Judge Hugh M. Morris. Tours are available, but our goal was to explore the trails near the estate on a short hike. We followed the Chestnut Hill trail, a 3.3 mile loop, through the woods behind Judge Morris’s house. The trail, which ranges from a 5% grade up to 25%, was predictably muddy, but signs of spring were visible everywhere.

My hiking partner and I didn’t even see a third of what’s available in the park over two weekends, and I’m excited to go back! In addition to over 30 miles of hiking trails, White Clay Creek State Park is known among my circle of friends as an ideal mountain biking destination. The park is also home to a nature center, fishing spots in appropriate seasons, picnicking opportunities, and even allows hunting in certain cases. In addition to the trails and other features covered above, the park also has horseshoe pits, a nature store, a playground, restrooms, and a volleyball court available for visitors.

Things to Know Before You Go

White Clay Creek State Park and White Clay Creek Preserve are day-use areas and are open from 8:00 am to sunset daily. If you’re planning to visit the Judge Morris Estate, or park in any of the large parking lots, be aware that some parking lots require a small fee.

Download the Delaware State Parks Pocket Ranger® App before you leave with you. Maps are also also available at the park office at 750 Thompson Station Road, Newark, DE. You can keep up with all park happenings via their Facebook page.

If you’re biking, be sure that the trail you choose is a multi-use trail. The trails are also pretty muddy in the spring. In an effort to prevent erosion and to keep the trails in good condition, wait until things dry up a bit before you head out.

Overall, I can’t wait to see the rest of White Clay Creek State Park. If you’ve been to White Clay Creek, what are some of your favorite activities? What should I do on my next visit?

State Park Ruins

Ruins may have originally been regarded as obstacles to progress, but now they’re admired for their aesthetic and historical properties.

Kinzua Bridge State Park – Ruins of the Kinzua Bridge

State Park Ruins

Kinzua Bridge Ruins
[Image: www.upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/9e/Collapsed_Kinzua_Bridge.jpg]

Ruins are physical remains of deliberate destruction, lack of maintenance over many years, or in the case of the Kinzua Bridge, natural disaster. During restoration operations in 2003, the bridge was destroyed by a tornado, leaving some dramatic ruins.

History

Built from iron in 1882 (later rebuilt with steel), the Kinzua Bridge briefly enjoyed the status of world’s tallest railroad bridge (for two years). Now it is the keystone attraction of Kinzua Bridge State Park. This is the only park in Pennsylvania’s state park system that has a man-made structure as its centerpiece.

The tornado brought down 11 of the 20 bridge towers. Now, the park has the Kinzua Sky Walk, made up of an observation deck and a walkway on the still-standing section of the bridge. When getting ready to check out these cool ruins, be sure to download the free Pennsylvania State Parks and Forests Guide!

Sweetwater Creek State Park, New Manchester Manufacturing Company Mill Ruins

State Park Ruins

Textile Mill ruins at Sweetwater Creek State Park, by photographer William Haun
[Image: www.pinterest.com/pin/42432421460526093/]

History

These are the ruins of the New Manchester Manufacturing Company. This building was a textile mill that was burned during the Civil War. During the Atlanta Campaign in the summer of 1864, General Joseph E. Johnson left the New Manchester Mill exposed when he moved with his confederate army away from the location. Union cavalry units commanded by Major Thompkins and Colonel Silas Adams approached the factory, shut it down, and arrested the employees. Several people have later said that Major Thompkins burned the mill. The ruins still standing today are the brick walls and millrace, a channel that carries water to the water wheel. 

State Park Ruins

Image: www.en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:NewManchesterManufacturingCompanyRuins.jpg

A lot of professional photographers like William Haun (above) take compelling pictures of ruins. Ruins can also make great visual metaphors, reminding us of decline in other ways. These classes below at Sweetwater give visitors a great opportunity to explore the ruins as a subject for visual art and creativity!

Upcoming Sweetwater Events

Art In the Park
Sunday, Apr 6, 2014 11:30 AM to 1:30 PM
Friday, Apr 18, 2014 1 PM to 3 PM
Bring your canvas and paint, clay, camera, or oil pastels for exclusive access to the interior of the five-story New Manchester Mill. Create your own artwork while you enjoy beautiful views of the Sweetwater Creek rapids alongside the dramatic mill ruins as we welcome spring. Reservations required.  $10 plus $5 parking. 770-732-5871.

Photography 101 (Class 1-Lighting)
Saturday, Apr 19, 2014 11 AM to 1 PM
Join Georgia State University professor Nancy Floyd, the artist-in-residence at Sweetwater Creek, as we learn about lighting. You don’t need an expensive camera to take good pictures. A simple point-and-shoot will do. Bring your manual.  $15 plus $5 parking. 770-732-5871.

Photography 101 (Class 2-Composition and Point of View)
Saturday, Apr 12, 2014 11 AM to 1 PM
Saturday, Apr 26, 2014 11 AM to 1 PM
Join Georgia State University professor Nancy Floyd, the artist-in-residence at Sweetwater Creek State Park, as we learn about Composition and Point of View. You don’t need an expensive camera to take good pictures. A simple point-and-shoot will do. Bring your manual.  $15 plus $5 parking.770-732-5871. Of course you’re going to want to have your free Pocket Ranger® Georgia State Parks app when you visit here!

Ha Ha Tonka State Park Ruins

State Park Ruins

The ruins of Robert Snyder’s mansion
[Image: www.pinterest.com/pin/216735800790097777/]

History

The stone ruins are what is left of the mansion of the wealthy business man who originally developed the area. Modeled after castles of Europe from the 1500s, the mansion was destroyed by fire in 1942. Originally bought by Robert McLure Snyder in 1904, he was quoted as saying this about the area: “Here I will spend my leisure, secure from the worries of business and the excitement of city life. I will fish and loaf and explore the caves of these hills, with no fear of intrusion.”

State Park Ruins

Image: www.en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Ha-Ha-Tonka.jpg

Now you can check out the area and the caves yourself! See what might have attracted this successful business man here in the first place. For the best way to explore, head over to the Pocket Ranger® Missouri State Parks and Historic Sites app page for the free download. Anybody have any suggestions of other cool state park ruins to visit and photograph?

9 Genius Hiking Hacks to Take Your Treks to the Next Level

Who doesn’t love a life hack? We might like to challenge ourselves when exploring the great outdoors, but that doesn’t mean that we don’t appreciate tips and tricks to make our outings just a little bit easier. With that in mind, we’ve decided to follow our first two installments of outdoor hacks up with another roundup of the most genius hacks the Internet has to offer. This time we’re tackling hiking hacks, so strap on your boots and prepare to hit the trails with a whole new bag of tricks up your sleeve.

1. When darkness descends a bit more suddenly than expected, create an insta-lantern by directing your cell phone light through a bottle or jug of water. This gives off an atmospheric glow rather than a direct beam of light.

cell phone water bottle lantern

Image: www.snapguide.com

2. Practicing Leave No Trace Principles means you may occasionally have to pack out your waste TP. Sprinkle baking soda in the bags you plan to use for this purpose beforehand, which will decrease unpleasant odors.

3. If you find yourself in need of a little hiking aid, fashion your own walking stick.

make your own walking stick

Image: www.wikihow.com

4. Tired of wires getting tangled in your packs? Keep phone chargers and other electrical device wires organized with the help of hair clips. You’ll never have to stop and untangle again.

5. Want an easy way to estimate remaining daylight? (We are assuming, of course, that you spent your phone battery tracking trails and marking waypoints with your Pocket Ranger® app, since the app’s weather tab is the #1 way to check on sunrise and sunset times.) This brilliant graphic says it better than we could:

estimate daylight

Image: www.showmenow.com

6. Did you lose your matches or lighter, or – GASP – forget to pack them? Don’t worry; you’re not doomed to darkness. Here’s how you can start a fire without matches.

7. Speaking of matches, you can waterproof yours at home with shellac. You just need strike-anywhere matches, shellac, a cardboard box, double-sided tape, and tweezers.

waterproof matches with shellac

Image: www.briangreen.net

Adhere a strip of double-sided tape to the edge of the box. Use the tweezers to gently dip each match into the shellac. Make sure you don’t dip it all the way up to the tweezers. Lift the match out of the shellac, give it a little shake, and push it up against the tape upside down. The matches will drip-dry as they hang here, so it’s a good idea to place a paper towel underneath them to catch the drips. Once the matches dry, you’re all set!

8. When your hike is over, your hacks don’t necessarily have to end too. After your hike, stuff wet hiking boots with balled up newspaper to help them dry. Replace the newspaper every few hours until the boots have dried completely.

newspaper in hiking boots

Image: www.runeatrepeat.com

This is a better method than placing your boots in the sun or near a radiator, which can cause the boots to crack.

9. Your hiking boots may also be a bit smelly post-hike. Combat odors by placing a dry tea bag inside your boots after your hike is finished.

We hope these genius hiking hacks will make your treks even more enjoyable. What are your favorite hiking hacks? Leave us a comment and let us know!

Hiking Snacks for Kids: 5 Great Recipes

A lot of these hiking snacks for kids are things that are totally buyable in stores. But if you’re feeling adventurous and you want to add a personal touch to your child’s early hiking experiences, check out these recipes.

Wellness Bars

Courtesy of Wellness Mama

Hiking Snacks

Image: www.wellnessmama.com/1047/wellness-bars/

Granola bars or energy bars are always a staple for some quick energy turnaround. Highly portable and not too messy, these options are also great for children with dietary restrictions.

One of the pros to making your own energy bars is YOU control all the ingredients! You can be sure your kids are eating something healthy that’s free of preservatives and other artificial ingredients.

Ingredients

  • ⅓ cup nuts (cashews, almonds, etc) Reminder: peanuts are not nuts!
  • ¼ cup whole dates (remove pits)-about 3 large dates
  • ¼ cup raisins (or more dates)
  • dash of cinnamon (optional)

Instructions

  1. Put nuts into food processor (or Vitamix) and chop to small pieces. Remove and put in bowl.
  2. Put dates and raisins (any combination of the two that equals ½ cup total) into the food processor and pulse until playdough consistency. It will start to clump together when it is done.
  3. Mix the two ingredients by hand until well incorporated and you have the consistency of stiff playdough or cookie dough. (You can do this all in the food processor also.)
  4. Roll between two sheets of wax paper to a ½ inch thickness and cut into bars. (Or make it really easy and just roll into energy balls!)
  5. Wrap in wax paper, plastic wrap or snack size ziploc bags (or glass containers if you aren’t giving to kids) and store in fridge until ready to use.
  6. Enjoy!

Frozen Banana Protein Smoothies To Go

Courtesy of Rhythm of the Home

Hiking Snacks

Image: www.rhythmofthehome.com/2013/05/recipes-for-easy-hiking-snacks/

The double benefit of these smoothies is that they are a great way to have a cool down break in the warmer weather! Heather Fontenot from rhythm of the home uses freezer jars like these that are BPA-free. You can keep them in the freezer and pack them as you head out for your hike. You’ll be glad you have them as a treat!

Ingredients

  • 2 bananas (we freeze our bananas to keep for smoothies, but frozen or not are fine)
  • 3 cups milk (we use almond)
  • 2 tbsp cocoa nibs
  • 1 tbsp honey
  • 1/3 cup dates (pits removed)
  • 1 tbsp ground chia
  • 2 tbsp coconut oil
  • 1/4 cup raw almond butter

Directions

  1. Add all ingredients into a high powered blender, such as a Vitamix, and process until smooth and creamy.
  2. Pour into freezable containers, and allow to set over night.
  3. In the morning, simply throw into a lunchbox or hiking pack, and enjoy whenever you need a cold break.

Homemade Fruit Leather Recipe

Courtesy of Penniless Parenting

Hiking Snacks

Image: www.pennilessparenting.com/2012/06/homemade-fruit-leather-recipe.html

Fruit leather is good for a quick snack option on the trail. Penny points out that the best part about making your own fruit leather is using natural ingredients and avoiding the preservatives and added sugar in the store brand (of course buying them is also convenient). Even without all the excess sugar, it’s a treat your kids are sure to love!

This example uses apricots but you can use almost any fruit like plums, pears, strawberriesk bananask and cherries.

Ingredients

  • Fruit (fresh, or canned and strained, raw or cooked)

Directions

Hiking Snacks

Image: www.pennilessparenting.com/2012/06/homemade-fruit-leather-recipe.html

  1. Cut off all the blemishes from your fruit.
  2. Blend the fruit in a blender or food processor until relatively smooth. Small chunks are ok.
  3. Line a baking tray with baking paper, then smooth the blended fruit onto the tray. You should probably use more than pictured [above]- this is too little and makes a thinner, cracklier fruit leather instead of a very pliable.
  4. Put in the oven on the lowest temperature setting possible, and prop open the door a drop (less than a centimeter) to allow moisture to escape.
  5. Check on the fruit every so often, and remove from the oven when it’s dry. Be careful not to keep it in too long or it will burn and/or dry out too much. I found this needed between 2 and 4 hours, depending on how thick I piled it on the baking paper.
  6. Peel the baking paper off the fruit leather, and cut into strips.

Strawberry Almond Energy Bites

Courtesy of Rhythm of the Home

Hiking Snacks

Image: www.rhythmofthehome.com/2013/05/recipes-for-easy-hiking-snacks/

Sometimes you just need a bit of something delicious to keep you going on your hike. These Strawberry Almond Energy Bites from rhythm of the home are convenient to make ahead of time and you can keep them in the fridge.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup almonds
  • 6 dates
  • 1/4 cup coconut
  • 1/4 sunflower seeds
  • 2 T almond butter
  • 1 T coconut oil
  • 1/4 cup dried strawberries – diced

Directions

  1. Process the almonds in a food processor until chopped.
  2. Add the rest of the ingredients through the almond butter, and process until finely combined. Add the diced dried strawberries, and process only until incorporated.
  3. Roll into balls and refrigerate until ready to use. Makes 8.

Blueberry Sunflower Energy Bites

Courtesy of Spabettie

Hiking Snacks

Image: www.spabettie.com/2013/04/15/blueberry-sunflower-energy-bites/

Here’s a similar idea to the previous recipe, in the convenience of ball form but changing up the ingredients with blueberries. These are dairy, soy, and gluten free.

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup raw cashews
  • 6 Medjool dates, pitted
  • 3/4 cup dried blueberries
  • 1/3 cup sunflower seed butter
  • 1/2 teaspoon spirulina powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • pinch sea salt
  • sesame seeds, for coating

Directions

  1. Place cashews in food processor, pulse to a small crumb.
  2. Add dates and blueberries, pulse to combine.
  3. Add sunflower butter, spirulina powder, cinnamon and salt, combine.
  4. Roll into 1 inch balls, coat in sesame seeds. Makes 13-14 pieces.

Fun Snack Bags for Kids

Hiking Snacks

Image: http://www.etsy.com/listing/103970256/reusable-snack-bag-eco-friendly-snack?ref=shop_home_active_1

Here are some great reusable (and therefore eco-friendly!) sandwich bags for your kids! These are handmade with some fun prints and durable ripstop lining inside. They are machine washable and dryer safe.

Feel free to share any ideas about kids snacks that are fun to make and perfect for hiking!

Morel Hunting Basics

Image: morelsandmore.com

Image: www.morelsandmore.com

Spring is officially here and mushroom hunters across the country are eagerly awaiting the return of the spring king: Morchella (morels). Morels are associated with spring because they often appear following that first spell of heavy rain and mild temperatures. Morels are prized for their delicate nutty flavor and fetch as much as $100 per pound in stores. Adding to their mystique is that commercial efforts to grow them have been a failure. Currently there are 19 species of morel in North America, but the most popular and widespread are the yellow morel, white morel, and black morel.

morel jackpot [Image: indianapublicmedia.org]

morel jackpot [Image: indianapublicmedia.org]

Mushroom hunting is a wonderful way to spend time in the woods with friends and family. In fact, kids tend to make the best mushroom hunters because they’re low to the ground. However, before you go out, you need to know how to positively ID morels with 100% certainty. Morels are not hard to identify (finding them is much harder) but there is one mushroom in particular that morel hunters should know and avoid: the false morel.

Avoid this mushroom [Image: diendenbinghallah.blogspot.com}

Avoid this mushroom [Image: www.diendenbinghallah.blogspot.com]

The false morel, sometimes known as a brain fungus or beefsteak morel, differs from real morels in several important ways. On morels, the cap is attached to the stem and if cut lengthwise will be completely hollow (the stalk of a false morel is not hollow.) The cap, known as the ascocarp, contains pits and ridges while the cap of a false morel is folded and wrinkled. In general, the top part of a morel resembles the conical hat of a gnome and ranges in color from light cream to dark brown. It should be noted that despite their toxicity, some people eat false morels. However, unless you have previous experience with the false morel, the best thing to do is avoid it.

Morels are hollow [image: www.ifish.net]

Morels are hollow [Image: www.ifish.net]

The hardest morel to find is your first. Many mushroom hunters get discouraged because morels are very picky about when and where they grow. It also doesn’t help that morel hunters are famously prickly and tight-lipped about their favorite spots. The reason for this is that the mushrooms often grow in the same vicinity year after year. When they do finally grow, the season is short, as morels need plenty of moisture and dry out quickly.

In general, the season begins after a week of nighttime temperatures in the 50s. Cool temperatures, followed by a nice spring soaking, make for perfect morel conditions. Look near stream beds and around fallen trees. These mushrooms prefer deciduous forests of oak, poplar, and especially elm. Old apple orchards are also notorious morel hideouts.

Image: www.nwfoodnews.com

Image: www.nwfoodnews.com

So, you found some mushrooms. Congratulations! Morels have a delicate flavor that doesn’t hold well if dried or frozen. Morels contain small amounts of a toxin that may cause an upset stomach if not soaked in water for a couple hours. When cooking morels, the trick is to keep it simple, so as to not overwhelm their natural flavor. Simply sauté them in a cast iron skillet with butter, and serve as a side or toss into a pasta dish. Remember, morel hunting is hard, but if you persist you won’t be disappointed.